RSS

Yakushiji – Edo period Daihannyakyō books actually from Nara period

07 Feb

Yakushiji temple (薬師寺) in Nara prefecture has in its possession a set of folding books (orihon 折り本) belonging to the Large Sūtra on Perfect Wisdom, or Daihannyakyō (大般若経) – the full name being the Daihannyaharamittakyō (大般若波羅蜜多経) or Mahāprajñāpāramitā-sūtra. The Daihannyaharamittakyō was translated by Genjō (玄奘; Hsüan-tsang [Xuanzang]), a Chinese  yakkyōsō (訳経僧; a monk employed to translate sutras) of the first half of the 7th century.

Researchers announced on February 1, 2010, however, that 47 of the books, until now considered as belonging to the Edo period, were actually produced during the Nara-period (710-794). This exciting discovery is made all the more interesting by the revelation that they were actually used for services until approximately 30 years ago.

(picture source)

A monk from Kōfukuji (興福寺) in Nara prefecture, Eion (永恩; 1167-?) is known for compiling Daihannyakyō sutra scrolls from the Nara to Heian periods into a collection known as the Eionkyō (永恩経) or Eiongukyō (永恩具経). Originally in scroll form (makimono 巻物), the Yakushiji texts were made into folding books in the Edo period, and have been misunderstood as Early Modern texts ever since.

The great majority of the scrolls belonging to the Eionkyō have disappeared, with only approximately 40 of the 600 (which would comprise one set) having been previously found.

Each folding book measures 25.6 centimeters tall and a length of 8-10 meters if stretched out fully.

Eion’s vermillion signature was found at the end of a volume in September 2010, leading researchers to identify the text as the Eionkyō. Judging from the handwriting and quality of the paper, the text was dated to the Nara period. Handwritten notations and dates have also been found, such as “Jōei 1″ (貞永元年[1232]) and “Tenpuku 1″ (天福元年 [1233]). A section of the Eionkyō belonging to the Kyoto National Museum has a handwritten date of Tenpyō 2 (天平2年 [730]).

Eion’s signature can be seen within the circle, above (picture source)

See The Princeton Companion to Classical Japanese Literature ( p. 380) for more information on the Daihannyaharamittakyō.

奈良時代の写経47巻 – 薬師寺、29年前まで法要で使われていた
2011年2月2日 奈良新聞
奈良市西ノ京町の薬師寺で、奈良時代に写された大般若経が47巻まとまって見つかり、薬師寺が1日、発表した。興福寺の僧、永恩(えいおん)が鎌倉時代に集めた「永恩具経」と呼ばれる大般若経(全600巻)の一部で、全国で約40巻しか確認されていない。発見で約6分の 1がそろったことになり、全体像に迫る貴重な資料となる。
昨年9月、境内の蔵を調査中に職員が発見。紙質や字体から奈良時代の写経と判断した。1巻当たりの長さは8~10メートル。末尾に永恩の署名があり、読みやすいよう、朱色で句切り点が打たれている。
昭和57年まで法要で使われたが、江戸時代の版本と混成の大般若経で、奈良時代の写経と気づかなかったという。
興福寺の僧房で句切り点を入れたことや「貞永元年(1232年)」「天福元年(1233年)」の日付も朱書きされていた。
永恩具経は奈良時代の写経を集めて構成され、京都国立博物館所蔵の2巻が重要文化財に指定されている。
薬師寺宝物管理研究所の稲城信子研究員は「奈良時代の写経を多数含む大般若経は極めて少なく、薬師寺で発見された意義は大きい」と話している。
発見された永恩具経は今月26日から3月6日まで、東京都品川区の薬師寺東京別院で公開される。

AR2011/02/07

http://www.nara-np.co.jp/20110202105136.html

薬師寺:「酷使」のお経、奈良時代 永恩収集の47巻、製作時期判明
奈良市の薬師寺は1日、奈良時代に書かれた大般若経の経本47巻が見つかったと発表した。鎌倉時代に興福寺の僧、永恩(えいおん)が集めたものの一部で、約30年前まで実際に法要で使われていた。600巻1セットのうちこれまで約40巻が確認されているだけで、同寺は「これだけまとまって見つかるのは珍しい」としている。
永恩が集めた経本は「永恩経」と呼ばれ、朱で句切点や永恩の署名が書き込まれている。このうち、「天平2(730)年」の銘がある京都国立博物館所蔵のものは重要文化財に指定されている。
同寺に伝わった時期は不明だが、毎月8日に営む「大般若経転読法要」で、経本を空中でバラバラとめくって箱などにたたき付ける転読に使ってきた。83年1月に新調したものと取り換え、古い経本は蔵に収めた。昨年9月、古い経本を調べたところ、巻物だった永恩経を折本に改装したものが47巻含まれていた。
法要で実際に使っていたという同寺の加藤朝胤(ちょういん)主事は「これだけ古いものが最近まで使われていたことに、薬師寺の歴史の深みを感じる」と話す。26日から同寺東京別院(品川区)で開かれる「薬師寺の文化財保護展」で初公開される。【花澤茂人】
毎日新聞 2011年2月2日 大阪朝刊

AR2011/02/07

http://mainichi.jp/kansai/archive/news/2011/02/02/20110202ddn012040022000c.html

江戸時代の経本、実は奈良時代の写経だった 薬師寺
2011年2月2日8時54分
奈良・薬師寺は1日、寺所蔵の大般若経(だいはんにゃきょう)47冊が、奈良時代に書写された経巻を再構成した「永恩経(えいおんきょう)」の一部とわかったと発表した。元は巻物だったが、江戸時代に折り本に仕立て直されたらしく、これまで江戸時代の経本とされていた。永恩経は約40巻しか見つかっておらず、重要文化財級の発見という。

永恩(1167~?)は鎌倉時代を生きた奈良・興福寺の僧で、奈良~平安期の経巻を集めて大般若経全600巻の再構成に取り組んだ。永恩経の大半は散逸し、京都国立博物館の2巻が重文指定されている。

今回、永恩経とわかった経本は、1冊が縦25.6センチ、長さは折り目をならすと8~10メートル。昨年9月、巻末の「奥書」に朱書きされた永恩の署名から「永恩経」と判明。筆跡などから、奈良時代の写経と判断された。

薬師寺宝物管理研究所の稲城信子研究員は「奈良時代の写経の発見は奈良でも数例。まとまって見つかった意味は大きく、重文級だ」と話す。

経本は26日~3月6日、東京・五反田の薬師寺東京別院で開かれる「薬師寺の文化財保護展」(朝日新聞社後援)で公開される。(編集委員・小滝ちひろ)

AR2011/02/07

http://www.asahi.com/culture/update/0201/OSK201102010131.html

About these ads
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 7, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: